3DStuffmaker

3DStuffmaker eVOLUTION Personal 3D Printer

Customer Reviews

Based on 5 reviews
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S
Simon B.
Could be a lot better.

I just reached the end of the roll of PLA supplied with my Evolution printer, here's my review:

Overall: It works, but producing quality prints is a combination of luck, skill and appropriate sacrifices to the gods.

On Arrival:
A month after I ordered the 'in-stock' item, it finally arrives, not from the shop in Australia I thought I was buying it from, but from the manufacturer in India, who built it on-request, - a request that was dated ten days after I made my order.
The printer appears to be a slightly customized rep-rapper kit that has been pre-assembled -its based on an arduino mcu prototyping board. This has the advantage that it can be fixed and modified, but don't expect anything like a commercial printer.

It took me over an hour to remove the packaging, and had to partially dis-assemble the printer to do so. This caused some issue as there are no assembly instructions and the manual that does come with it assumes that you assembled the thing yourself. I had to trawl the internet to find a picture of how the build plate was supposed to be attached.

Despite the ridiculous packaging it still arrived with several cracks in the laser-cut perspex. The black edition may be better here as the cracks would be less obvious.

Now, to actually use your printer you will need a power-supply. This they only tell you AFTER you have bought the thing.
Neither do they mention that you can't just go to Dick Smiths or Jaycar and get a wall-adapter, as it requires the sort of power-supply that your laptop probably uses: 12v at 5 amps, (your standard plugin adpter does at most 1 amp) - after exhausting all the electronic and hardware stores in the south-east of melbourne, I ended up cannibalizing the ATX power-supply from an old desktop PC.

The setup and calibration process for the printer is a nightmare. The 'instruction manual' that comes with the printer is poorly written, and poorly xeroxed, there is a large reliance on the pictures, which cannot be made out clearly in the low quality black and white photo-copy. It would have been much more sensible to include a soft copy of the manual that could be clearly seen at least, but I cannot find a soft copy on the supplied CD or the internet. In addition to the pictures in the manual being just black smudges, the wording is terrible and little to no explanation is given for any step - so its hard to make out the pictures, the words dont make any sense, and there is no additional information that might help you decode the wording.

The calibration requires you to align the print nozzle 0.2mm away from the build plate at each corner. It took several read throughs to establish that that was the intention of the steps they give.

Any slight variation from this calibration means the model will slip and the print destroyed: 3d printing requires that the model adhere to the build plate perfectly - I would suggest going for a printer with a heated build plate - the kapton tape covered platform that comes with this one is going to be the cause of most print errors.

The 0.2mm calibration required by the instructions is for the 0.4mm nozzle that was supposed to come with it, however after numerous failed prints, a lot of swearing, and enough wasted time to blow my deadline, I discovered that they had supplied me with a 0.7mm (a much cheaper) nozzle, which requires the build plate be 0.4mm from the nozzle tip - ripped off, both in what I thought I was paying for, and in the waste of most of a roll of PLA, and days of wasted effort trying to get it to print with the wrong settings.

I am now facing the issue of trying to use the next roll of PLA. The silicone tubing that guides the PLA from the feeder into the nozzle, that was just slipped into the connectors is impossible to remove. The instructions just say 'remove the tube from the blue connector' - I am still trying to do that without breaking the printer; At the moment it is a very expensive waste of space in my workshop.

All in all, you should probably buy a makerbot.

S
Simon B.
Could be a lot better.

I just reached the end of the roll of PLA supplied with my Evolution printer, here's my review:

Overall: It works, but producing quality prints is a combination of luck, skill and appropriate sacrifices to the gods.

On Arrival:
A month after I ordered the 'in-stock' item, it finally arrives, not from the shop in Australia I thought I was buying it from, but from the manufacturer in India, who built it on-request, - a request that was dated ten days after I made my order.
The printer appears to be a slightly customized rep-rapper kit that has been pre-assembled -its based on an arduino mcu prototyping board. This has the advantage that it can be fixed and modified, but don't expect anything like a commercial printer.

It took me over an hour to remove the packaging, and had to partially dis-assemble the printer to do so. This caused some issue as there are no assembly instructions and the manual that does come with it assumes that you assembled the thing yourself. I had to trawl the internet to find a picture of how the build plate was supposed to be attached.

Despite the ridiculous packaging it still arrived with several cracks in the laser-cut perspex. The black edition may be better here as the cracks would be less obvious.

Now, to actually use your printer you will need a power-supply. This they only tell you AFTER you have bought the thing.
Neither do they mention that you can't just go to Dick Smiths or Jaycar and get a wall-adapter, as it requires the sort of power-supply that your laptop probably uses: 12v at 5 amps, (your standard plugin adpter does at most 1 amp) - after exhausting all the electronic and hardware stores in the south-east of melbourne, I ended up cannibalizing the ATX power-supply from an old desktop PC.

The setup and calibration process for the printer is a nightmare. The 'instruction manual' that comes with the printer is poorly written, and poorly xeroxed, there is a large reliance on the pictures, which cannot be made out clearly in the low quality black and white photo-copy. It would have been much more sensible to include a soft copy of the manual that could be clearly seen at least, but I cannot find a soft copy on the supplied CD or the internet. In addition to the pictures in the manual being just black smudges, the wording is terrible and little to no explanation is given for any step - so its hard to make out the pictures, the words dont make any sense, and there is no additional information that might help you decode the wording.

The calibration requires you to align the print nozzle 0.2mm away from the build plate at each corner. It took several read throughs to establish that that was the intention of the steps they give.

Any slight variation from this calibration means the model will slip and the print destroyed: 3d printing requires that the model adhere to the build plate perfectly - I would suggest going for a printer with a heated build plate - the kapton tape covered platform that comes with this one is going to be the cause of most print errors.

The 0.2mm calibration required by the instructions is for the 0.4mm nozzle that was supposed to come with it, however after numerous failed prints, a lot of swearing, and enough wasted time to blow my deadline, I discovered that they had supplied me with a 0.7mm (a much cheaper) nozzle, which requires the build plate be 0.4mm from the nozzle tip - ripped off, both in what I thought I was paying for, and in the waste of most of a roll of PLA, and days of wasted effort trying to get it to print with the wrong settings.

I am now facing the issue of trying to use the next roll of PLA. The silicone tubing that guides the PLA from the feeder into the nozzle, that was just slipped into the connectors is impossible to remove. The instructions just say 'remove the tube from the blue connector' - I am still trying to do that without breaking the printer; At the moment it is a very expensive waste of space in my workshop.

All in all, you should probably buy a makerbot.

J
James McGowan
Could Be Better

I was happy to receive the eVolution, it was possibly the most well packed it I've eve had shipped.
Initial set up was quick and easy.
Inital printing was marred by constant slipping of the filament due to the hobbed bolt being very shallowly cut.
The print plate has warped after only several prints.
The gears on the extruder do not mesh well and are not adjustable do to design.
Over all it works but has multiple design issues. If I had been more educated at tie of purchase would have chosen an alternate printer.

J
James McGowan
Could Be Better

I was happy to receive the eVolution, it was possibly the most well packed it I've eve had shipped.
Initial set up was quick and easy.
Inital printing was marred by constant slipping of the filament due to the hobbed bolt being very shallowly cut.
The print plate has warped after only several prints.
The gears on the extruder do not mesh well and are not adjustable do to design.
Over all it works but has multiple design issues. If I had been more educated at tie of purchase would have chosen an alternate printer.

I
Ian Padden
Read my review carefuly.

I don't have my printer yet. It is slightly unprofessional that you do not know what is going on with my attempt to change my order. I have talked to 'Simon' and Mark regarding this. You should know what is going on in your company before you make assumptions. I cant help but second guess your company and I am actually considering canceling my order completely. I've been in contact with Mark, he seems to be a human and trying to help. I will let you know what my final decision is after I talk to Mark. I wish your company had a phone number so I could speed things up a bit and talk to a real person, not a robot that doesn't know what is going on. I hate to be rude but this is almost too much. I hope you understand.


The eVOLUTION comes delivered fully assembled and ready to print. Boasting a 200x200x200mm(8 litres) build volume and now capable of superfine 0.1mm layer build increments. This printer will be able to be upgraded to include up to 4 colour print heads, so you can print multi coloured and multi material parts (coming soon). Australian design and engineered, backed with a 12 month part replacement warranty, this is the best value personal 3D printer available today. 

This printer is suitable for the tinkerer at heart. If you want to experiment and customise your printer, change print heads build platforms etc, then this it the one for you.

Print area (X Y Z): 200x 200 x 200 mm
Machine dimensions LxWxH: 478 x 456 x 430mm
Maximum Print Size (cm3): 8000
Print speed: 2.5m minute (theoretical m  ax speed 10m min)
The Layer Thickness: 0.1 mm [range 0-1000microns]
 Positional Accuracy (x,y): 0.05mm
Print 3D Materials: PLA (calibrated for PLA)
Power Requirements: 12V DC, 5A
CAD input data file format supported: STL
Operating system- minimum or later: XP or later
Hardware recommended: 1.8 GHz with 1 GB RAM (basic)
Printing modes/output: Solid- honeycomb or hollow 3D objects
Print Nozzle diameter: 0.7mm
No. of print heads: 1 (soon to be upgradable to 4)
Color head ready: yes
Nozzle/Extruder Head drive: STANDARD 0.7mm [optional 0.2mm and 0.4mm available as extra.]

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